God’s Little Nugget: Day Four

dark times teach you alot quotes

A couple of years back my husband and I loaned my son’s girlfriend five thousand dollars to purchase a car. We should have known when the first payment came due and she made no efforts to contact us or start repaying the monies she took that it would never be repaid.

Her actions aren’t unsettling as the actions of people that claim to like and love me are.  Loaning her such a large amount of money purchased me life lesson’s I will never forget.

This is what I’ve learned:

  • Some kisses and hugs that come across as sentimental are fake even when they come from trusted family members and loved ones.
  • Not everyone rejoice when you strive for and gain financial security.
  • Not everyone wishes you well.
  • Promissory Notes don’t secure your efforts in retrieving monies loaned.
  • Only evil people pretend to love you,
  • and only jealous people are glad for your misfortune.

What happened to me was a Black on Black crime.  She’s black.  I’m Black.  She took money she never meant to pay back.

Since that unfortunate moment I’ve learned about helping others, especially when I’m also in need of financial help.

The money she kept was money that would have paid upcoming and expected bills.

My husband and I paid an expensive price for the lesson I needed to learn.  If there’s a silver-lining in all of this I venture to write, I’m the better for what took place because I learned many things about “man’s inhumanity to man.”

 

Day Five: Son’s Need Encouragement

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATO MY SON

I look to you with hope and pride;
I see your future brightly.
Your deep concerns and aspirations
I will not take lightly.

The future is a mystery
That everyone explores.
I’ll share your possibilities,
Embrace your distant shores.

I’ll answer you when questions stir,
Encourage you, implore you.
But life’s a challenge shaped by dreams,
A gift I can’t live for you.

So live it well; respect it full;
Play your spirit out.
Seek and then discover
All the best that life’s about.

Remember that you’re not alone—
My love is always there.
The challenge that defines your life
My heart will gladly share.

You’re on a voyage into time,
A trip to somewhere new.
You may not always see me there,
But I’ll be there with you.

–Bruce B. Wilmer

Quote for Today: At Least She Ain’t Standing Still

Let me first start with, I was hesitant to write the below paragraphs.  And I surely was nervous about posting such a bold quote on America.

But please understand I read loads of material each day.  Because of what I choose to read everyday I find myself fighting the blues on some level or another.  However, I’m not sure if I choose to read everything and anything or if my hobby as a blogger demands I read an array of subjects.  But whatever the case maybe I know one thing is for sure, it really bothers me when I read nasty comments about America and Americans.  And as an American it really angers me when Americans makes unpatriotic remarks about the country they call home.

As a pet free home I recently learned:  neither dogs nor pigs will shit where they live!  And with that said, I found a suitable quote for those that feel America and its people are contemptible:

Photo credit:  Internet
Photo credit: Internet

 

 

America makes prodigious mistakes, America has colossal faults, but one thing cannot be denied: America is always on the move. She may be going to Hell, of course, but at least she isn’t standing still.  —E. E. Cummings

Prayers of Black Women: Amazing Grace by John Newton

John Newton

John Newton is the author of this spiritually enlightenment hymn.  At the age of eleven he became a seaman and later was imprisoned.  After escaping from those that held him captive he found work on a slave-trading ship.  It was then God began to work on his conscience about the cruelties of slavery.  And it was then when he wrote this beautiful hymn as a testament to his transformation from being a slave-ship captain to becoming a Christian.

Most often God takes our wrong to right the wrong of man’s inhumanity to man.  We’re His wonderful creation with the flaw of cruelty attached to our characters.  It is only by God’s amazing grace that saves us from always extending the hand of destruction to our brothers and sisters.

– Prayer –

I pray this day for God’s peace in your life.  I ask God to give you His grace.  For the Bible says, His grace is enough for you and His power is perfect in your weakness as His grace is new every morning.  Have a wonderful day!

Amazing Grace

Amazing grace, how sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch like me!
I once was lost, but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.

‘Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
And grace my fears relieved;
How precious did that grace appear
The hour I first believed!

Through many dangers, toils, and snares,
I have already come;
‘Tis grace has brought me safe thus far,
And grace will lead me home.

The Lord has promised good to me,
His word my hope secures;
He will my shield and portion be
As long as life endures.

When we’ve been there ten thousand years,
Bright shining as the sun,
We’ve no less dys to sing God’s praise
Than when we’d first begun.

The Prayers of Black Women: Please Bless Us With Common Sense

Artist:  Henry Lee Battle
Artist: Henry Lee Battle

Lord, I have read and heard a lot this week.  Many of those stories made me feel like I was traveling through a portal of stupidity.  Often I found myself asking the following questions:  Lord, is my thinking off track?  Or are people now enjoying conflict?  And why are they enjoying being hoodwinked?  What is making them so gullible?  And why can’t they see they are being invalidated?

Lord, as I sat in bewilderment over the troubles of the world, I asked, yet, another question, “Where is common sense?”  Has it left the world?  Has it found a hiding place?  Is it sad because humankind no longer has a need for it?  Lord, where is common sense?  Because as I see things, who would enjoy heartaches, trials and tribulations?

Nothing I read or heard this week made any sense at all except for:  “Something that sounds correct could be incorrect.” 

— Prayer —

Lord, please bless the world with common sense.  For without it mankind will become void in all their ways.  So, again, please Lord bless the world with common sense.  Amen

 

Ronald Reagan’s “1986” Independence Day Speech

Photo taken from:  www.glogster.com
Photo taken from: http://www.glogster.com

Each year I’m challenged to find a famous Independence Day speech.  And each year I’m surprised by my findings.

This years post is of Ronald Reagan’s speech given July 4, 1986.

For the past couple of days I have read so many unpatriotic comments about Americans.  But the funny thing about those comments . . . they were made by Americans. Have we lost the American dream?  Our we willing to give up the freedoms that was paid for with blood of fellow dead Americans?  Or our we so grief stricken because of social differences that we can no longer forge courage to press forwards to embrace our nations independence as a blessing of God?

For the sake of our country let us reflect upon the patriotic words spoken by our 40th President, Ronald Reagan.  Let us come together in unity today and find hope for a nation that seemingly have lost its way.  Let us not find fault with Ronald Reagan’s speech but let us hear a message of hope:

My fellow Americans:

In a few moments the celebration will begin here in New York Harbor. It’s going to be quite a show. I was just looking over the preparations and thinking about a saying that we had back in Hollywood about never doing a scene with kids or animals because they’d steal the scene every time. So, you can rest assured I wouldn’t even think about trying to compete with a fireworks display, especially on the Fourth of July.

My remarks tonight will be brief, but it’s worth remembering that all the celebration of this day is rooted in history. It’s recorded that shortly after the Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia celebrations took place throughout the land, and many of the former Colonists — they were just starting to call themselves Americans — set off cannons and marched in fife and drum parades.

What a contrast with the sober scene that had taken place a short time earlier in Independence Hall. Fifty-six men came forward to sign the parchment. It was noted at the time that they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honors. And that was more than rhetoric; each of those men knew the penalty for high treason to the Crown. “We must all hang together,” Benjamin Franklin said, “or, assuredly, we will all hang separately.” And John Hancock, it is said, wrote his signature in large script so King George could see it without his spectacles. They were brave. They stayed brave through all the bloodshed of the coming years. Their courage created a nation built on a universal claim to human dignity, on the proposition that every man, woman, and child had a right to a future of freedom.

For just a moment, let us listen to the words again: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” Last night when we rededicated Miss Liberty and relit her torch, we reflected on all the millions who came here in search of the dream of freedom inaugurated in Independence Hall. We reflected, too, on their courage in coming great distances and settling in a foreign land and then passing on to their children and their children’s children the hope symbolized in this statue here just behind us: the hope that is America. It is a hope that someday every people and every nation of the world will know the blessings of liberty.

And it’s the hope of millions all around the world. In the last few years, I’ve spoken at Westminster to the mother of Parliaments; at Versailles, where French kings and world leaders have made war and peace. I’ve been to the Vatican in Rome, the Imperial Palace in Japan, and the ancient city of Beijing. I’ve seen the beaches of Normandy and stood again with those boys of Pointe du Hoc, who long ago scaled the heights, and with, at that time, Lisa Zanatta Henn, who was at Omaha Beach for the father she loved, the father who had once dreamed of seeing again the place where he and so many brave others had landed on D-day. But he had died before he could make that trip, and she made it for him. “And, Dad,” she had said, “I’ll always be proud.”

And I’ve seen the successors to these brave men, the young Americans in uniform all over the world, young Americans like you here tonight who man the mighty U.S.S. Kennedy and the Iowa and other ships of the line. I can assure you, you out there who are listening, that these young are like their fathers and their grandfathers, just as willing, just as brave. And we can be just as proud. But our prayer tonight is that the call for their courage will never come. And that it’s important for us, too, to be brave; not so much the bravery of the battlefield, I mean the bravery of brotherhood.

All through our history, our Presidents and leaders have spoken of national unity and warned us that the real obstacle to moving forward the boundaries of freedom, the only permanent danger to the hope that is America, comes from within. It’s easy enough to dismiss this as a kind of familiar exhortation. Yet the truth is that even two of our greatest Founding Fathers, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, once learned this lesson late in life. They’d worked so closely together in Philadelphia for independence. But once that was gained and a government was formed, something called partisan politics began to get in the way. After a bitter and divisive campaign, Jefferson defeated Adams for the Presidency in 1800. And the night before Jefferson’s inauguration, Adams slipped away to Boston, disappointed, brokenhearted, and bitter.

For years their estrangement lasted. But then when both had retired, Jefferson at 68 to Monticello and Adams at 76 to Quincy, they began through their letters to speak again to each other. Letters that discussed almost every conceivable subject: gardening, horseback riding, even sneezing as a cure for hiccups; but other subjects as well: the loss of loved ones, the mystery of grief and sorrow, the importance of religion, and of course the last thoughts, the final hopes of two old men, two great patriarchs, for the country that they had helped to found and loved so deeply. “It carries me back,” Jefferson wrote about correspondence with his cosigner of the Declaration of Independence, “to the times when, beset with difficulties and dangers, we were fellow laborers in the same cause, struggling for what is most valuable to man, his right to self-government. Laboring always at the same oar, with some wave ever ahead threatening to overwhelm us and yet passing harmless . . . we rowed through the storm with heart and hand . . . .” It was their last gift to us, this lesson in brotherhood, in tolerance for each other, this insight into America’s strength as a nation. And when both died on the same day within hours of each other, that date was July 4th, 50 years exactly after that first gift to us, the Declaration of Independence.

My fellow Americans, it falls to us to keep faith with them and all the great Americans of our past. Believe me, if there’s one impression I carry with me after the privilege of holding for 5\1/2\ years the office held by Adams and Jefferson and Lincoln, it is this: that the things that unite us — America’s past of which we’re so proud, our hopes and aspirations for the future of the world and this much-loved country — these things far outweigh what little divides us. And so tonight we reaffirm that Jew and gentile, we are one nation under God; that black and white, we are one nation indivisible; that Republican and Democrat, we are all Americans. Tonight, with heart and hand, through whatever trial and travail, we pledge ourselves to each other and to the cause of human freedom, the cause that has given light to this land and hope to the world.

My fellow Americans, we’re known around the world as a confident and a happy people. Tonight there’s much to celebrate and many blessings to be grateful for. So while it’s good to talk about serious things, it’s just as important and just as American to have some fun. Now, let’s have some fun — let the celebration begin!


 

Reagan’s speech was taken from:  http://freedomoutpost.com/2012/07/reagans-independence-day-speech-july-4-1986/