The Prayer’s of Black Women

March 16

He who walks with wise men will be wise, But the companion of fools will suffer harm.

Provers 13:20

When my children were young I would tell them why people were good and or bad for them before I removed the toxic person from their life. I had no clue I was teaching and laying the foundation for them in becoming wise when it came to choosing their companions. I only knew it was the right thing to do, especially since I loved them and wanted the best for them.

Strengthening my beliefs when teaching my kids about healthy relationships was an episode on Focus On The Family. A young mother such as myself prayed for her children’s future spouses. From her thoughts it appears she nor I knew what we were truly asking God. Our prayers were lightyears in front of our requests. Hindsight is twenty twenty: In order for our children to pick excellent mates for themselves they had to become wise to relationships.

PRAYER

Lord always protect me and my descendants from harm with your wise counselors.  Amen

Make The Ordinary Come Alive

Photo taken at Rocky Mountain National Park by author, Annette Harrison

“Do not ask your children
to strive for extraordinary lives.
Such striving may seem admirable,
but it is the way of foolishness.
Help them instead to find the wonder
and the marvel of an ordinary life.
Show them the joy of tasting
tomatoes, apples, and pears.
Show them how to cry
when pets and people die.
Show them the infinite pleasure
in the touch of a hand.
And make the ordinary come alive for them.
The extraordinary will take care of itself.” ~William Martin

Valerie Castile

February 15

A mother’s love is the fuel that enables a normal human being to do the impossible.

Mitch Albom
Valerie Castile | Chris Juhn – MSR News

Valerie Castile’s unfortunate life change is every parent’s concern and every parent’s potential nightmare, especially for Black parents. Her son Philando was “denied the right to live” in a state she felt was safe to raise him. After his life was quickly taken during what should have been a minor traffic stop, she’s been on a mission to ensure interactions between law enforcement and the communities they serve work together for public safety. To make certain police accountability continues and children are fed lunches daily, Valerie created the Philando Castile Relief Foundation.

Lathardus Goggins Ph.D., Ed.D, Ed.S (1927-2009)

February 3

To achieve greatness one should live as if they will never die.

Francois De La Rochefoucauld

I learned of Dr Lathardus Goggins while researching my family tree. He married one of my 2nd cousins 1x removed. As I added his leaf I stumbled across his impressive life story. It was a sad moment to learn he’d died. Yet, I found myself rejoicing he lived a fruitful and very rewarding life where he walked among giants. Below is his obituary:

Photo taken from Akron Beacon Journal/Ohio.com

After a year-long struggle with pancreatic cancer, Dr. Lathardus Goggins passed away peacefully in his sleep December 4, 2009 at 3:45 a.m.

Lathardus (Bop, Goggins, Pops, Daddy, Grandpa, Papa) was born December 29, 1927 in Anniston, Ala. to Douglas and Willice (Griffin) Goggins.

When Lathardus was four years old, his father moved the family from Alabama to Buffalo, N.Y., during the “great migration” from the south to the north. At the age of 17, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps (now the Air Force) and trained at Tuskegee during the end of World War II. He received an Honorable Discharge in 1949.

On August 26, 1951, he married Doris Corine Byrd in Buffalo, N.Y.

Lathardus attended Central State and Ohio State Universities, where he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees, respectively. Lathardus returned to Buffalo, N.Y, taught Social Studies for Buffalo Public Schools, and pledged Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

Before joining The University of Akron in 1969, Lathardus taught in East Africa, where he was a member of the first wave of Teachers for East Africa (TEA), one of the first international initiatives of the Kennedy Administration that provided teachers for secondary schools and teacher training colleges in East Africa during the 1960s. Also, Lathardus taught at Florida A & M University, Grambling State University, University of New York at Plattsburg, and Brooklyn College.

On December 17, 1965 he married Ellen L. Osborne, while working in Grambling, La.

Dr. Goggins earned doctorates from St. John’s University in New York (Ph.D., History/African Studies) and The University of Akron (Ed.D., Higher Education Administration) and Education Specialist (Ed.S.) from Kent State University. He also earned multiple masters degrees from The University of Akron. At The University of Akron, he was a Professor of Geography and rose to become Associate Dean of the Graduate School. Additionally, Dr. Goggins was a visiting professor at the University of Warsaw in Poland and traveled extensively aboard: Senegal, Benin, Liberia, Nigeria, Ghana, Zaire, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, Mexico, People’s Republic of China, India, Australia, Bulgaria, Poland, Germany, and Canada.

During his tenure, Dr. Goggins was a witness and responsible for many changes at the university that ultimately affected the city of Akron. Dr. Goggins developed the minority graduate recruitment initiative and recruited hundreds of students to the University. He was most proud of the 98 percent graduation rate from his program. In 1999, he was the first African-American to receive a UA rocking chair for 30 years of service. After 36 years of scholarship and service to The University of Akron, Dr Goggins retired in December 2005. In 2008, the Dr. Lathardus Goggins Endowed Scholarship was established.

Preceded in death by daughter, Denise Goggins; Lathardus Goggins leaves wife, Dr. Ellen O. Goggins; three children, Brenda Goggins Laster, Cheryl Goggins Barnes (Melton Sr.), and Dr. Lathardus Goggins II (Wanda); ten grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; seven siblings; and a host of nieces, nephews, special cousins and friends.

The family suggests in lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Dr. Lathardus Goggins Endowed Scholarship Fund. Envelopes will be available at the December 19, 11 a.m. memorial celebration at the Arlington Church of God, Akron, OH 44306 or donations may be mailed to: Dr. Lathardus Goggins Endowed Scholarship Fund, Department of Development, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-2603

Dr Monica Moreno Figueroa

February 2

“I’m very interested in the life of racism, how racism works, how racism is felt and experienced by people,”

Dr Monica Moreno Figueroa
Dr Monica Moreno Figueroa, Lecturer in Sociology | Photo taken from University Of Cambridge website

Dr Monica Moreno Figueroa is Black-Mestiza and Mexican. She was born and raised in a middle class family in Mexico. She’s a co-founder of Collective to Eliminate Racism in Mexico (COPERA). Currently, she’s an Associate Professor in Sociology at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow in Social Sciences at Downing College. Her determination to shed light on racism in Mexico has aided in Mexicans of African descent being counted in a historic 2020 Census.

Isabella Baumfree: Sojourner Truth

February 1

“If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.”

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), 1860’s Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Isabella aka Sojourner Truth was born a slave 1797 in Swartekill, New York. She was the daughter of James and Elizabeth Baumfree. It appears Sojourner was a strong voice for women’s rights, an abolitionist and author. Years after the death of the only man she loved, she was forced to marry an older slave named Thomas, also owned by her master. To their union four of the five children born belonged to them as her daughter Diana was fathered by John Dumont. One of her greatest challenges was suing her youngest son’s master. Once she’d learned he’d sold her child to someone in Alabama she became concerned. The sale would prevent Peter from being freed under New York law once he turned 21 years old. It took faith in God and determination but she won her case. Peter was returned to New York and eventually given to her, as she was the only one that could claim him legally. Sojourner moved to Battle Creek, Michigan to be with at least one of her daughters. She died November 26, 1883 in Battle Creek, Michigan.

The Prayer’s of Black Women

January 28

The Lord your God, who is going before you, will fight for you, as he did for you in Egypt, before your very eyes,

Deuteronomy 1:30 NIV

Sometimes people lose sight of their main goal(s) when they become distracted by fear. Goals are awesome dreams waiting to be born that are sometimes aborted because of conflict supported by self-doubt. Let’s pray.

PRAYER

Father God, we come to you seeking refuge. Refuge for our souls and our aspirations. Give our hearts peace concerning the fate of goals that are seemingly in jeopardy because of enemies. Block their efforts and never let us be afraid of their weapons as we take hold of your promises. Amen

The Prayer’s of Black Women

January 26

For such persons do not serve our Lord Christ, but their own appetites, and by smooth talk and flattery they deceive the hearts of the naive.

Romans 16:18

After being informed that a group of rouge spirits had taken control of a task they ignored for over thirty years, I was told not to be upset. I was puzzled and later confused as to why several people thought I would take offense to being overruled. For me, the situation I was handling netted me next to nothing but benefited others greatly. Only small minded people that lack self-worth would be upset. I worked through my mental whatever’s within less than 24 hours. Hell! It didn’t even take that long for me to realize I was wasting time sulking over their losses! I saw the situation for what it was and is. I prayed for the naïve individuals that followed the Pied Piper and moved on. Let’s pray!

PRAYER

Father, thank you for your grace and mercy. I pray protection and release for those that are held captive by deceptive individuals. People who deceive others only care about their outcome, as their victims lay in their wake. Amen

The Prayer’s of Black Women

January 5, 2020

There is no “reset” button in life. You can’t take anything back, and you can’t undo anything. All of your actions have consequences, and the things you say and do today will have a lasting impact on the rest of your life. You have to understand that, and you have to be aware of it while making your decisions.

Author Unknown

I’m still wrestling with naming my guilt a day later. I wonder how many others are doing the same. For some, such as me, the guilt that enters our thoughts was imposed upon us. And, thus, make it hard to name. It’s too bad those that wronged us have no clue how deeply their words and or deeds impacted our lives. Their actions tied us to emotions that are for better or for worse. Let’s pray!

Prayer

Artwork by Henry Lee Battle

Father God, bring clarity to imposed guilt. Amen

The Prayer’s of Black Women

January 3, 2022

And there will be a highway called the Way of Holiness. The unclean will not travel it–only those who walk in the Way–and fools will not stray onto it.

Isaiah 35:8

Wow! When I discovered this scripture I had no clue it would minister to me. Mainly, because it was a random scripture I found and enjoyed. However, according to Michael J. Chan, “Isaiah 35 is a powerful poetic word of comfort for the mourning Judahite exiles, who lost their temple, land, and sovereignty.”

I felt I’ve lost everything I worked so hard to gain trying to help foolish people I thought needed saving. In the end I realized after my sacrifices all they needed were firm black and white choices. A revelation that came years after my soul began to cry loudly about the losses in my life.

In retrospect I was the foolish one. My good hearted nature leaves me with complex feelings of failure and mourning the wonderful life I no longer live. And the funny thing about my wounds is, I’m not alone. There are countless others feeling the same for many reasons of their own. Let’s pray!

Prayer

Photo by Henry Lee Battle

Father God, it’s a new year with endless possibilities. Walk with us on our Earthly journey keeping our feet from straying onto a fools highway. Amen