Estelle Massey Riddle Osborne

February 4

Nurses are a unique kind. They have this insatiable need to care for others, which is both their greatest strength and fatal flaw.

Jean Watson, American nurse theorist and nursing professor

Estelle’s life story was taken from her Find A Grave Memorial.

Photo taken from Find A Grave

Estelle Osborne, 80, Is Dead; Leader in Nursing Profession
Published: December 17, 1981
NY Times

Estelle M. Osborne, a leader in the nursing profession for many years, died last Saturday in Oakland, Calif., where she had been living in retirement. Mrs. Osborne, a former resident of Elmhurst, Queens, was 80 years old.

She had been an official of the National League for Nursing, a New York-based coalition seeking to improve education and services in nursing.

She had also been a director of the American Nurses’ Association, vice president of the National Council of Negro Women and a member of the New York Urban League’s advisory committee.

Mrs. Osborne, who had been an assistant professor at New York University’s School of Nursing, Held bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Teachers College, Columbia University.

She is survived by a sister, Mamie McGruder of Los Angeles.

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Health and Medicine Journals » ABNF Journal » Article details, “Great Black Nurses Series: Estelle Massey…”
Great Black Nurses Series: Estelle Massey Riddle Osborne
ABNF Journal
ACADEMIC JOURNAL ARTICLE
By Mosley, Marie O. Pitts
ABNF Journal , Vol. 13, No. 5

Estelle Massey Riddle Osborne (May 3, 1901- Dec. 12, 1981), African-American nurse, author, administrator, researcher, and consultant was a pioneer in organizational administration and a significant leader in struggles to eliminate discrimination in society as a whole and in the national professional nursing organizations in this country.

Mrs. Osborne’s fight to eliminate exclusionary practices for blacks in nursing occurred during the time when rigid patterns of segregation and discrimination in nursing education and employment for blacks existed across this country. Black codes limiting access to institutions of learning and job opportunities, designed to constrain and contain Blacks, were legislated and enforced by laws and customs in the North and in the South. Working tirelessly for forty-three years, Mrs. Osborne was steadfast in her efforts to ensure that future Black nurses would have the opportunity to be experientially and educationally prepared to assume higher positions in nursing and have the opportunity to do so.

Estelle Massey was born in Palestine Texas, the eighth of eleven children, to Hall and Bettye Estelle Massey. Hall was just a handyman and farmer and Betty Estelle a domestic, but they were the most progressive and intelligent parents in town, Black or White. Dogged determination to rise above social norms and expectations of Blacks was demonstrated in where and how they lived and the way they reared their children. Living in the heart of an impoverished region where many Blacks and Whites lacked decent housing for their children, Hall bought property at the edge of the White section of town and built a home for his family. The Massey family was a self-sufficient, self-contained unit. The males fed the family and earned money by raising and selling their own vegetables and livestock, and Mrs. Massey made the family’s clothing and earned money cleaning White people’s homes. Even though Mrs. Massey worked in the homes of Whites, she never allowed her daughters to do so. She knew firsthand that Whites felt that Blacks were inferior, and she never wanted her daughters to be exposed to this type of ignorant bigotry. Neither parent was educated, but they determined that their children would be. All of the Massey children received an education that included a minimum of two years of college – an oddity for this time and place.

After high school, following in two of her sibling’s footsteps, Mrs. Osborne enrolled in and graduated as a teacher from Prairie View State College, but after two years of teaching elementary school in a one room school house, she desired a change. One summer, during a visit with her brother Dr. Edward Massey, a dentist in St. Louis, and while working as his dental assistant, Mrs. Osborne confided in him her desire to follow in his footsteps and also become a dentist. Offering no specifics as to why she should not become a dentist, he strongly urged that she reconsider her another perspective career choice.

Dr. Massey determined to turn his sister’s thoughts elsewhere, made a plan and set it in motion. Edward, along with interns from the hospital next door to his house, throughout the summer, would fill Mrs. Osborne’s head with stories of nursing and the new nurses’ training school at their hospital. Daily bombardments from her brother and his friends led Mrs. Osborne to agree to go and talk to the training school’s superintendent.

A few days later, in a non-committed fashion, Mrs. Osborne half-heartily met with the school’s superintendent. Following their talk, Mrs. Osborne was invited to join the other students who had entered training weeks earlier. Despite all that was said to her at that first meeting, Mrs. Osborne was not prepared to commit. Two days later, however, to everyone’s surprise, Mrs. Osborne returned to the hospital and agreed to become a student at City Hospital No. 2’s first nursing class. Initially, Mrs. Osborne was not stimulated nor was she very happy with her training. …

March 20th, 2013
Estelle Massey Osborne: fighting racial discrimination

By Lillie Howard
Estelle Massey Osborne was born in Palestine, Texas on May 3rd, 1901. Her parents guided their 11 children to be strong, independent and confident. Besides being wonderful advocates for pursuing dreams, her parents were thoughtful and protective parents, so to avoid being exposed to racism, Estelle and her sisters were not allowed to work for white employers.

Estelle attended Prairie View State College, and became a nurse. Needing more education, she enrolled in Columbia University’s Teachers College in New York City.While there she taught at the Lincoln School for Nurses in the Bronx, and became the first nursing instructor at the Harlem Hospital School of Nursing. After earning her BA in 1931, Estelle became the first educational director of nursing at the Freedmen’s Hospital School of Nursing, which is now the Howard University College of Nursing.

In 1936, she again made history as the first African-American director of nursing at City Hospital #2 and later became the first black consultant to the National Nursing Council for War Service. After earning her master’s degree, Estelle became the first African-American member of the nursing facility at New York University in 1946. This led to a role on the board of directors of the American Nurses Assoc. and the position of Associate General Director of the National League for Nursing.

During World War II, while employed at the Nursing Council for War Service, Estelle was a part-time lecturer at New York University. In 1947, she joined the faculty on a full-time basis, teaching courses in community problems, group relations, fundamentals in nursing and other courses in the university’s Department of Nursing. Estelle proved that with the combination of higher education and the practical application of her nursing skills, she could break new barriers and create unlimited opportunities for herself and all other African-American nurses, and the effects of her actions are still serving us today. She is also credited with breaking the color bar in nursing during World War II, and contributing “substantially” to the “improved public image” and the advancement of educational and economic opportunity for Negro nurses. “…it is no exaggeration to say,” writes Edna Yost, that Negro nurses “have more opportunity today than they would have had without Estelle Massey, and so have Negro citizens throughout our population.” Estelle’s personal struggles for survival in this profession contributed substantially to improving economic and educational opportunities for Negro nurses.

To a member of a minority group, it is of supreme significance to become a “first,” and thereby open the door of opportunity to other members. Estelle opened many such doors for Negro nurses. The first scholarship award for advanced study by the Julius Rosenwald Fund to a Negro nurse went to Estelle Osborne in 1929. She was the first Negro superintendent of nurses and director of the Nursing School at the Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis; the first Negro nurse to receive the degree of Master of Arts with a major in nursing from Columbia University Teachers College. In 1949, when she was a member of the board of directors of the American Nurses Association, Estelle was sent to a meeting of the International Council of Nurses to be selected as an official delegate. When she was appointed consultant to the Coordinating Committee on Negro Nursing for the National Council for War Service, she became the first Negro to hold such an office on the staff of any national nursing organization.

Truthfully, there is so much more to learn about Estelle Massey Osborne but I don’t have the space to do so at this moment in time. “It takes a specific kind of person to be a nurse. It is a field that requires an elegant balance of intelligence and compassion, and the wisdom to know which is needed in each moment. Estelle Massey Osborne was dedicated to becoming the finest nurse she could possible be and was an advocate of greater opportunities for black nurses. Even then, she knew what is widely known today: higher education translates into increased opportunities.

Most of this information was found in “The Negro Heritage Library’s Profiles of Negro Womanhood” published by Educational Heritage, Inc.

Let me leave you with these words: education is the door that opens up opportunities, therefore we must make sure that our school system, Board of Education and parents are dedicated to our children no longer being allowed to be “drop-outs”. This will translate into increased and greater opportunities for them, which will only benefit our community. We must also get involved with our city government to ensure that there will be jobs for our children in their hometown once they acquire their education. This is Lillie’s Point of View!

Lathardus Goggins Ph.D., Ed.D, Ed.S (1927-2009)

February 3

To achieve greatness one should live as if they will never die.

Francois De La Rochefoucauld

I learned of Dr Lathardus Goggins while researching my family tree. He married one of my 2nd cousins 1x removed. As I added his leaf I stumbled across his impressive life story. It was a sad moment to learn he’d died. Yet, I found myself rejoicing he lived a fruitful and very rewarding life where he walked among giants. Below is his obituary:

Photo taken from Akron Beacon Journal/Ohio.com

After a year-long struggle with pancreatic cancer, Dr. Lathardus Goggins passed away peacefully in his sleep December 4, 2009 at 3:45 a.m.

Lathardus (Bop, Goggins, Pops, Daddy, Grandpa, Papa) was born December 29, 1927 in Anniston, Ala. to Douglas and Willice (Griffin) Goggins.

When Lathardus was four years old, his father moved the family from Alabama to Buffalo, N.Y., during the “great migration” from the south to the north. At the age of 17, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps (now the Air Force) and trained at Tuskegee during the end of World War II. He received an Honorable Discharge in 1949.

On August 26, 1951, he married Doris Corine Byrd in Buffalo, N.Y.

Lathardus attended Central State and Ohio State Universities, where he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees, respectively. Lathardus returned to Buffalo, N.Y, taught Social Studies for Buffalo Public Schools, and pledged Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

Before joining The University of Akron in 1969, Lathardus taught in East Africa, where he was a member of the first wave of Teachers for East Africa (TEA), one of the first international initiatives of the Kennedy Administration that provided teachers for secondary schools and teacher training colleges in East Africa during the 1960s. Also, Lathardus taught at Florida A & M University, Grambling State University, University of New York at Plattsburg, and Brooklyn College.

On December 17, 1965 he married Ellen L. Osborne, while working in Grambling, La.

Dr. Goggins earned doctorates from St. John’s University in New York (Ph.D., History/African Studies) and The University of Akron (Ed.D., Higher Education Administration) and Education Specialist (Ed.S.) from Kent State University. He also earned multiple masters degrees from The University of Akron. At The University of Akron, he was a Professor of Geography and rose to become Associate Dean of the Graduate School. Additionally, Dr. Goggins was a visiting professor at the University of Warsaw in Poland and traveled extensively aboard: Senegal, Benin, Liberia, Nigeria, Ghana, Zaire, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, Mexico, People’s Republic of China, India, Australia, Bulgaria, Poland, Germany, and Canada.

During his tenure, Dr. Goggins was a witness and responsible for many changes at the university that ultimately affected the city of Akron. Dr. Goggins developed the minority graduate recruitment initiative and recruited hundreds of students to the University. He was most proud of the 98 percent graduation rate from his program. In 1999, he was the first African-American to receive a UA rocking chair for 30 years of service. After 36 years of scholarship and service to The University of Akron, Dr Goggins retired in December 2005. In 2008, the Dr. Lathardus Goggins Endowed Scholarship was established.

Preceded in death by daughter, Denise Goggins; Lathardus Goggins leaves wife, Dr. Ellen O. Goggins; three children, Brenda Goggins Laster, Cheryl Goggins Barnes (Melton Sr.), and Dr. Lathardus Goggins II (Wanda); ten grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; seven siblings; and a host of nieces, nephews, special cousins and friends.

The family suggests in lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Dr. Lathardus Goggins Endowed Scholarship Fund. Envelopes will be available at the December 19, 11 a.m. memorial celebration at the Arlington Church of God, Akron, OH 44306 or donations may be mailed to: Dr. Lathardus Goggins Endowed Scholarship Fund, Department of Development, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-2603

It Takes All Kinds Of People to Make This A Beautiful World

diversityMost of you know that I enjoy couponing. I really enjoy giving to others. But for the past year what I have learned about me is that I HATE hypocrites!
 
I get all kinds of thoughts coming across my Facebook feed. Most of it is well wishing something personal, some of it deals with cruelty to animals, but the bulk of it deals with racism in America. Let me return to the subject of me couponing.
 
When I started my money-saving journey I never knew the doors of understanding that would open because of a paradigm change. In the last year I’ve lost friends for various reasons and most of those friends claim to be extremely religious or extremely knowledgeable about sex, race, religion, politics, and all other things that goes along with living life. And as I began to coupon I found myself in a spiritual place I didn’t even know exist and was able to read the hearts of those that claimed to love me.
 
I found myself caring less of what the world thinks of me as a black person. I found myself caring less of how people viewed my beloved car that is missing a quarter of its front bumper, a broken pulled down latched that was done by a Walmart worker. I found that my opinion mattered despite the rejections of others. I found I could validate another person’s opinion even though I didn’t agree with their belief.  I found myself feeling more put off by folks forcing themselves in my life in one form or another. I found myself being inspired by the single good-looking younger than me caring about morals successful business owner man down the street. I found myself reflecting upon my marital vows and how I treat the guy that goes to work everyday and misses sleep because he must get his load to the buyer on time.  I began to really put thought to how he gives me his paycheck each week (should he make a check) and questioned if I could do the same. I found myself wondering how I was going to pay back all the student loans my youngest took out in his name to attend college. And for you folks that feel my youngest should pay his student loans, close your pie holes! Please!

As my son’s parent it’s my job to see that he gets the best start in life. And! Since I made such a mess of my life by making poor decisions when I was young and netted nothing financially to aid my children when it came to helping them enter into the world as successful adults, then my son’s student loan repayments became mines because his entry into adulthood debt free is my job as his parent.

 
But the thing I’ve learned from couponing is that it takes all kinds of people to make this a beautiful world. 

Jackie Torrence an American Folklore Storyteller

Jackie TorranceJackie Torrence

February 12, 1944 – November 30, 2004

“If it had not been for storytelling, the black family would not have survived.  It was the responsibility of the Uncle Remus types to transfer philosophies, attitudes, values, and advice, by way of storytelling using creatures in the woods as symbols.”

Quote for Today: We The People

Photo Source:  www.sodhead.com
Photo Source: http://www.sodhead.com

We the people of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Vocabulary Mondays: self-assurance

Artist:  Artis Harrison
Artist: Artis Harrison

Word:  self-assurance¹

Part of Speech:

Meaning:

  1. self-confidence.²

Word Usage:

As she sat in the chair for her interview she displayed self-assurance.


 

¹Thesaurus.com/browse/self-assurance
²Dictionary.com/browse/self-assurance

Vocabulary Mondays: gratitude

Photo taken from:  A Conscious Beauty Blog
Photo taken from: A Conscious Beauty Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

Word:  gratitude

Part of Speech:  ¹noun

Meaning:

  1. the quality or feeling of being grateful or thankful.²

Word Usage:

He expressed his gratitude to everyone on the staff.³


¹Thesaurus.com./browse/gratitude>
[²][³]Dictionary.reference.com/browse/gratitude