God’s Little Nugget: Day Four

dark times teach you alot quotes

A couple of years back my husband and I loaned my son’s girlfriend five thousand dollars to purchase a car. We should have known when the first payment came due and she made no efforts to contact us or start repaying the monies she took that it would never be repaid.

Her actions aren’t unsettling as the actions of people that claim to like and love me are.  Loaning her such a large amount of money purchased me life lesson’s I will never forget.

This is what I’ve learned:

  • Some kisses and hugs that come across as sentimental are fake even when they come from trusted family members and loved ones.
  • Not everyone rejoice when you strive for and gain financial security.
  • Not everyone wishes you well.
  • Promissory Notes don’t secure your efforts in retrieving monies loaned.
  • Only evil people pretend to love you,
  • and only jealous people are glad for your misfortune.

What happened to me was a Black on Black crime.  She’s black.  I’m Black.  She took money she never meant to pay back.

Since that unfortunate moment I’ve learned about helping others, especially when I’m also in need of financial help.

The money she kept was money that would have paid upcoming and expected bills.

My husband and I paid an expensive price for the lesson I needed to learn.  If there’s a silver-lining in all of this I venture to write, I’m the better for what took place because I learned many things about “man’s inhumanity to man.”

 

Vocabulary Mondays: kelpie

Photo taken from:  TeachHub.com
Photo taken from: TeachHub.com

Word:  kelpie

Part of Speech:  noun

Meaning:  (in Scottish legends) a water spirit, usually having the form of a horse, reputed to cause drownings or to warn those in danger of drowning.

Word Origin and History:  

1747, Scottish, of unknown origin, perhaps related to Gael. colpach “heifer, steer, colt;” colpa “cow,horse.” The Lowland name of a demon in the shape of a horse that was reputed to haunt lakes and riversand to delight in causing drownings. But unlike its equivalents in Dan. (nøkken) and Icel.  –Dictionary.com

 

Grammatical Wednesdays – The Difference Between a Verb and a Predicate

Last week I wrote a blog-post stating a sentence requires a subject and a predicate.  However, this week I have learned a sentence must have a verb but the verb can also be a predicate.

The difference between a predicate and a verb is subtle, with a predicate relying on the use of a verb. In some sentences, a predicate and a verb can be the same word or, in the case of more complex sentences, you may use an additional verb to help describe a predicate. Knowing the difference between a predicate and a verb will help you formulate more complex sentences and identify common grammatical mistakes in your writing.

Read more: Difference Between a Predicate & a Verb | eHowhttp://www.ehow.com/info_8455026_difference-between-predicate-verb.html#ixzz2Ugx0HRNi

Whoa!  Laughter!  Do I have my work cut out for me.  Yikes!

The more I learn what formulates a sentence the more I’m learning I need to take my time in studying and blogging about grammar.   Thus, helping me to truly grasp the different parts of speech before I share information learned.

I don’t know about you but, it excites me to finally begin learning how to write and speak proper English.