Throwback Thursdays: Barbara Billingsley on Jive Talking

Well I learned something new today!  

I learned that most black people speak Jive.  This coded language that has unified American black people for decades is now called slang.  So far Jive remains unrecognized by most as a survival language that is mostly spoken among blacks.  The funny thing is Jive is a language that has been passed down from generation to generation despite educational successes within the black community.  Yet, society continues to equate this language with ignorance.  When in fact Jive is probably the first unity language created in America.  

Thou I try to remove the jargon from my vocabulary I must admit it makes me feel whole when I am with other blacks.  Honestly, knowing slang/Jive helps me to contact to a group or race of people who are rejected by society.  And perhaps that’s why so many young men and women from other races try to learn it.  

Maybe the young got it!  Maybe they realize Jive is a unity language that connects dislocated people.  I’m just sayin’ . . . maybe all young people feel dislocated in some fashion.  So to connect they speak slang.  Hum . . .           

 

Thinking by Walter D. Wintle

Photo by:  Annette Harrison
Photo by: Annette Harrison

If you think you are beaten, you are;
If you think you dare not, you don’t.
If you’d like to win, but think you can’t
It’s almost a cinch you won’t.
If you think you’ll lose, you’ve lost,
For out in the world we find
Success being with a fellow’s will;
It’s all in the state of mind.

If you think you’re outclassed, you are:
You’ve got to think high to rise.
You’ve got to be sure of yourself before
You can ever win a prize.
Life’s battles don’t always go
To the stronger or faster man,
But soon or late the man who wins
Is the one who thinks he can. –Walter D. Wintle

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary Mondays: kelpie

Photo taken from:  TeachHub.com
Photo taken from: TeachHub.com

Word:  kelpie

Part of Speech:  noun

Meaning:  (in Scottish legends) a water spirit, usually having the form of a horse, reputed to cause drownings or to warn those in danger of drowning.

Word Origin and History:  

1747, Scottish, of unknown origin, perhaps related to Gael. colpach “heifer, steer, colt;” colpa “cow,horse.” The Lowland name of a demon in the shape of a horse that was reputed to haunt lakes and riversand to delight in causing drownings. But unlike its equivalents in Dan. (nøkken) and Icel.  –Dictionary.com