Inspirational Fridays: What Ever Happened to The All American Dream?

Photo Taken From:  Wikipedia
Photo Taken From: Wikipedia

Today as I was surfing the web for international inspiration I stumbled across the blog of Fahrenheit Creative Group.  The admin of this wonderful blog gives people motivational and inspirational quotes and messages to live by.  After stumbling upon this wonderful blog site I almost forgot what I was looking for.

Oh.  Yeah.  I was searching for something that could be passed on to the American nation in a time of uncertainty.

I guess after listening to the opinions of those in my circle about America’s current insufficient funds status I have found their comments mind-boggling.  I really want to respond with “do you really believe that crap your voicing!”  And my response would not be in question form.  I would hope my statement would awaken their intellect in using commonsense [which is no longer common].

It seems everybody is running on scarcity.

Personally, I think the American people, that are generations rooted by birth, are tired of feeling left out.  Especially when it comes to the freebies given to those that are illegally living in our country and profiting from the American overtaxed entitlement programs.

It seems that everyone has lost sight of what made America great.  The economical dismay of our economy has brought forth spirits of defeat and disdain.  Especially for those we find different from our personal and professional communities.   The havoc that is being wreaked on lives as dreams are no longer a vision of hope makes me ask:  What ever happened to the all American dream?

One secret of success in life is for a man to be ready for his opportunity when it comes.
–Benjamin Disraeli

The American dream died when the government made it easy for a person to be given a fish when hungry.  And the quest for self-worth plummeted when the public demanded more entitlement programs from their local and state government officials.  And, sadly, these programs were implemented.  As I see things, these handouts removed the instinct for self-preservation.  And hinders people to remember and believe in a quote from our founding fathers’:

That all men are by nature equally free and independent and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.

Virginia Declaration of Rights

Remember only very few have profited from small government handouts and found true happiness.

Throwback Thursdays – Carey McWilliams

Photo Source:  www.sandiegohistory.org
Photo Source: http://www.sandiegohistory.org

Carey McWilliams

(1905-1980)

A Cloud of Suspicion

July 15, 1943

THE PRESENT AGITATION against the return of any evacuees is, in fact, being conducted with primary regard to nonmilitary considerations.  No attempt is made to disguise the fact that this agitation has for its real purpose the permanent exclusion of all Japanese from the west coast.  [Applause and cries of “Sure” and “Why not?”]  Its avowed purposes include such objectives as stripping the American-born Japanese of their American citizenship, establishing rigid economic barriers against them, and laying the foundation for their eventual deportation.  If this emerging pattern is permitted to take form now, it is likely to result in the indefinite postponement of the restoration of full citizenship even to those who have never been suspected of disloyalty.

Since this was not our intention in ordering mass evacuation, we should either promptly restore full citizenship rights or give an immediate guarantee of such restoration the moment the military emergency terminates.  We cannot ignore the fact that this current agitation is being largely predicated, now as in the past, upon dangerously irrelevant so-called racial considerations, unsupported by a shred of scientific evidence.

To make a race issue of this problem is to do precisely what Tojo is trying to do:  namely, to convince the colored peoples of the Far East that this is a race war.  How we handle the evacuee problem is, therefore, one measure to our intention to apply the four freedoms to all peoples regardless of color.  The peoples of India and China, as well as our own colored minorities, are watching the development of race feeling in the United States with the deepest concern.  There can be no doubt but that the manner in which the evacuee problem is being discussed on the west coast today has tended to heighten race tension in a dangerously irresponsible fashion.  Since race agitation seems to be cumulative in its intensity, scope, and consequences, any attempt to appease race bigotry can only result in stimulating further aggressions, not merely against the particular minority, but against all minorities.

As a Nation, we stand firmly committed to the great ideal that distinctions based upon race, color, or creed have no place in American life in peace or in war.  [Applause.]  If we permit the concept of citizenship to be broken down at one point for one group, we’re undermining the very structure of American citizenship.  We have never tolerated the notion that there could be different levels of citizenship with rights withheld from some citizens which were freely granted others.  Political subdivisions of the Nation, therefore, should not be encouraged in the arrogant assumption that they can set up their own canons of citizenship.  As I recall, there are forty-eight States in the Union.  Not forty-five and certainly not forty-seven.

Once investigated and released, no cloud of suspicion should follow the evacuees.  Unity is imperative in the war effort, but unity cannot be achieved if we listen to those who believe that loyalty is only skin deep. In the relocation centers today there are men who are veterans of the first World War.  Today, also, several thousand citizens of Japanese descent are serving with the armed forces of the Nation.  When on furlough, these soldiers are now permitted to visit the west coast on military passes.  They are to me, as I am sure they are to most American, living symbols of the greatness and strength of American democracy.  To suggest the race can be a test of loyalty is as insulting to these soldiers and to their families as it is to some sixteen million other American citizens whose skins happen to be red or black, yellow or brown.

Such a suggestion is utterly at variance with American ideals and is well calculated to jeopardize America’s magnificent opportunity for world leadership in an unprecedented crisis in hum affairs.  As President Roosevelt has reminded us, Americanism is a matter of the mind and heart.  Americanism is not, and never has been a matter of race of ancestry.

America New Frontier for American Female Slave Descendants

Do not allow to slip away from you freedoms the people who came before you won with such hard knocks.  ~David Herbert Lawrence

It has been said that American slaves were not ready for freedom.  Hum?  With a hint of sarcasm, I can’t help but wonder why people forced and kept in captivity would be ready for advancement.  With sincerity I wonder if those that made such a comment were correct.

After growing mentally, emotionally, acquiring knowledge on many subjects, and becoming aware of the importance of ethnicity, as a woman of color I see slavery as a sad life changing event for African-American descendants in a wonderful way.  Don’t get me wrong I feel slavery was horrible.  It was brutal.  It made captive men and women feel helpless and hopeless.  It kept their descendants in continual fear.  And most of all it made humans feel non-human.  But it changed the course of life for many African slave freed descendants.

The process of slave choice was methodical.  Before deporting African’s to their destination and to fulfill their future owners purposes as slaves each captive would be inspected.  Their chins were licked for body salt content; they were also examined for tropical diseases, and, as a result, only the best African captives were kept and shipped.  If an African did not pass the tests performed they would be set free.  Other words with out question the cream of the crop Africans made it to America.  Thus, meaning the American Black woman came from strong African genetic lineages.

Think on this:  The only reason slavery was permitted to run rampant is because God had greater purposes for the descendants of African captives.  But in order for God’s plan to come about he allowed the puppeteers (slave traders/slave owners) to control new captives and enslave workers with fear; hence, giving slave traders and slave owners the illusion of having total power.  For at any time during any part of the slave trade process God could have removed all fears.  Allowed each captive to speak the same language.  And take control of the situation because of the simple fact the newly captive and slaves outnumbered their oppressors.  Instead God remained silent for a greater purpose and allowed slavery to stay as an economical institution for over four centuries.  As a descendant of slaves, I feel God’s purpose was and is allowing America to become the new frontier for African American female slave descendants.

Remember this:  It is up to the American Black women as people and a gender group to welcome the opportunities.  Opportunities that were literally paid for with the blood of those that came before us.  Only a defeated person will lay and wallow in self-pity and allow opportunities to pass them by.  As I have told my grand-daughter when she wanted to join drama and choir and felt the doors were closed . . . keep going back until someone recognize you are serious about joining those activities.  I also made known that eventually someone will get tired of seeing her face and give her a chance to prove she is worthy for an audition.  She was frustrated!  She was feed up with my “go back’s.” And reluctantly she took my advice.  Today she is in drama and loving it!  It took her half the school year to get into drama but she made it!  In addition to joining drama she was recently selected to sing in the school talent show.  She is so excited!  Life is grand for her and again she loves it!

As Black women we have to work harder to meet our goals.  Most often the struggles are daunting and make our goals seem less important, but don’t give up and don’t give in.  Keep going!  If you can’t get in the front door hell try a side door.  If the side door won’t open check the back door.  If the back door is locked go through a window and if the window is locked cut a hole in the roof throw down a rope and make your dream happen!  Successes only come to those and for those people that are hungry for their desires to materialize!  So again I quote David Herbert Lawrence, “Do not allow to slip away from you freedoms the people who came before you won with such hard knocks.”

 

Every great dream…

Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world. -Harriet Tubman

As a woman of color I have grown into my ethnicity.  Currently as I research a life crisis I have stumbled across many online articles on Black women, their value to society globally and their place within the human race.  Appalled.  To say the lease.

Normally I blog under another name.  However, the issue [well to me it is an issue] at hand about the worth of Black women has forced me to creatively write for and about women of color and blog in my name.  And who better than . . . Since I am very connected to my blackness that loves being a woman of color!